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staining and sealing

One part science, five parts experimentation. Every wood boat veteran has their secret recipe for a showy finish. Share your trials and triumphs.

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John Cederstrom
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staining and sealing

Post by John Cederstrom » Tue Aug 02, 2016 6:19 am

On new mahogany is it best to seal with CPES before staining or stain before sealing? Or do both give good results? Also, I'm looking for a somewhat darker color. Can this be achieved by staining twice? I'm restoring a 16' 1946 Garwood Ensign.
John

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Bilge Rat
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Re: staining and sealing

Post by Bilge Rat » Tue Aug 02, 2016 6:48 am

Stain first, depending on temperature and humidity wait at least 4 days until dry then 2 coats of CPES. Do not use a foam brush for the CPES, it will leave chunks of foam behind as it attacks the foam and it would push the stain around. Whatever brush you use will be a throw away. The CPES dries/soaks in quickly, so the second coat can be applied in about 30 minutes. Don't worry about the CPES not leveling out and do not sand it, the following coats of varnish will level out fine. Expect some of the stain color to show up in the container you're using for the CPES.

You'll have to experiment on stain color, two coats might work. Sanding with a courser than normal grit might allow more of the stain to be absorbed into the wood, making it darker.
1966 Lyman Cruisette 25 foot "Serenity Now!"
1953 Chris Craft Sportsman 22 foot "Summerwind"

joanroy
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Re: staining and sealing

Post by joanroy » Tue Aug 02, 2016 12:19 pm

Agree, always stain first over wood sanded to 80 grit. If your using a filler stain, thin to the consistency of thick paint, bush on full coat, wait about fifteen minutes more or less depending on conditions then wipe with a clean rag to achieve the tone you prefer. Less wipe will be darker, more will lighten and show more grain. After 48 hours of drying I use whatever sealer is recommended by the varnish manufacturer/type used. Light sand after first coat of varnish so as not to break into the stain. I don't use CPES as a sealer. Good Luck!

boat_art
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Re: staining and sealing

Post by boat_art » Tue Aug 02, 2016 4:49 pm

I use David Jerome's gel stain. 503 282 8562. Unfortunately David is no longer with us but his wife is handling the business. This is far and away the best stain I have ever used...no mixing or thinning...just wipe on and wipe off. After a day or so do it again for darker color. 80-100 grit first will help it absorb, never sand anything finer than 100. Then I use CPES but only after 3 or 4 days of curing. I wait another day after the first coat of CPES to apply the second to avoid smearing the stain. Then start with the varnish coats.
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Jim Bell
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Re: staining and sealing

Post by Jim Bell » Tue Aug 02, 2016 5:42 pm

I use Pettit clear sealer (2 coats) following filler/stain after 2-4 days depending on temp and humidity. 8)

John Cederstrom
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Re: staining and sealing

Post by John Cederstrom » Wed Aug 03, 2016 11:27 am

Thanks all for your inputs. Very helpful to me.

John C

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Doug P
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Re: staining and sealing

Post by Doug P » Thu Aug 04, 2016 10:20 pm

I use a small rubber squeegee at a 45 degree angle to the grain over an 80/100 grit sanding. I use burlap, almost immediately, to remove excess before the blush. I have never used CPES as it will penetrate the wood and IMHO I feel that if any sanding is done in succeeding years, one cannot get back to the bare wood to properly stain it especially if new wood has been added and the old wood needs to be matched

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