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Replacement Fuel Tank

Bronze, stainless, chrome or steel. If you need information about the non-wood items on your Chris-Craft, pose your questions here.

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Jim Godlewski
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Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Jim Godlewski » Sat Feb 24, 2018 8:53 am

We may have broken some rules on fuel tank guidelines. When we purchased our Sportsman in 99 we were kinda green on the whole restoration process and made a couple of decisions that were probably not the best at the time. For example, recoating the inside of the fuel tank in 2000. We thought the tank was original and seemed to be in good condition. The recoat job served its purpose to this day. I now know how important the fuel tank is and can't imagine the inside is going to last so I'm planning on a new replacement from a local tank manufacturing company. My questions are, 1. should I switch to a stainless fill neck pipe or keep the original brass one? Would dissimilar metals be a problem? 2. What about the pick up tube, reuse what I have? 3. reuse the vent tube asm?
Thanks.
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1956 17 Sportsman CC-17-2310
1930 Model 100 7152
https://1956chriscraftsportsman.shutterfly.com/

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mfine
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by mfine » Sat Feb 24, 2018 9:39 am

Ethanol makes fuel electrically conductive so you have to be careful with dissimilar metals to avoid galvonic corrosion issues.

What metal do you plan to use for the main tank?

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Jim Godlewski
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Jim Godlewski » Sat Feb 24, 2018 10:46 am

I'm in research mode and seeking guidance from the experts here for what should or shouldn't be used.
1956 17 Sportsman CC-17-2310
1930 Model 100 7152
https://1956chriscraftsportsman.shutterfly.com/

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drrot
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by drrot » Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:25 am

The original ones I have removed have either been galvanized steel or monel. Monel seems to survive better.
Jim Staib
www.finewoodboats.com

1931 Chris-Craft 26' #898 http://www.finewoodboats.com/1929%20Chris26.htm
1929 Chris-Craft 28' #3107 http://www.finewoodboats.com/1929%20Chris28.htm
1947 Penn Yan 12' Cartopper WXH474611
1950 Chris-Craft 22' Sportsman U-22-1532
1957 Chris-Craft 26' Sea Skiff SK-26-515
1968 Century 17' Resorter FG-68-174

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Jim Godlewski
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Jim Godlewski » Sat Feb 24, 2018 12:17 pm

The one show in the picture still looks to be in perfect condition and no fuel issues at all. I just feel I'm on borrowed time.
1956 17 Sportsman CC-17-2310
1930 Model 100 7152
https://1956chriscraftsportsman.shutterfly.com/

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drrot
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by drrot » Sat Feb 24, 2018 1:59 pm

Can you tell if it is galvanized or monel? Monel is a type of stainless. A magnet sticks good to galvanized and sticks but not as good to monel. How does it look inside?
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Jim Staib
www.finewoodboats.com

1931 Chris-Craft 26' #898 http://www.finewoodboats.com/1929%20Chris26.htm
1929 Chris-Craft 28' #3107 http://www.finewoodboats.com/1929%20Chris28.htm
1947 Penn Yan 12' Cartopper WXH474611
1950 Chris-Craft 22' Sportsman U-22-1532
1957 Chris-Craft 26' Sea Skiff SK-26-515
1968 Century 17' Resorter FG-68-174

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mbigpops
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by mbigpops » Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:24 pm

Here is a good article on brass and aluminum:

http://www.boats.com/reviews/keep-alumi ... pI5KHNOnZE

Mark
1953 CC Rocket Runabout "Rocket Man"

jim g
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by jim g » Fri Mar 09, 2018 5:24 pm

mbigpops wrote:
Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:24 pm
Here is a good article on brass and aluminum:

http://www.boats.com/reviews/keep-alumi ... pI5KHNOnZE

Mark
The last paragraph of the article states it very well.

You got to have seawater. i.e. Salt Water.

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mfine
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by mfine » Sat Mar 10, 2018 6:55 am

Nope, no need for seawater if there is ethanol in the fuel.

jim g
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by jim g » Sat Mar 10, 2018 9:17 pm

mfine wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 6:55 am
Nope, no need for seawater if there is ethanol in the fuel.
Which is why everyone should be running non ethanol in there boats and old cars. Along with fuel treatment at each fill up.

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mbigpops
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by mbigpops » Sun Mar 11, 2018 9:17 am

I have a new Rayco aluminum tank in my boat so I am interested in this discussion. I have been running standard fuel from my local gas station for two years now. I will have to check but for now I am assuming that it is E10 or 10 percent ethanol.

From what I have read so far on the internet most opinions are that E10 is not a problem with aluminum tanks. The problems occur at E15 or higher percentages of Ethanol. I have also read that the actual type of aluminum also matters and how susceptible it is to the effects of ethanol absorbing and reacting with water.

I did research a while ago on the availability of Ethanol free fuel in my area and found it only in very few gas stations that either serve airports or racing vehicles. It is also 93 or higher octane. Certainly not convenient or practical.

I think if we are going to figure this out the right way we would need an expert to weigh in on the subject that can attest to both the aluminum type and Ethanol percentage facts and how best to deal with the situation in terms of keeping the tank full or not, how long the fuel can stay in the tank and whether or not to use an additive.

Other tank types (stainless steel, galvanized, fiberglass) have issues as well so I don't see a perfect solution at this point.

Mark
1953 CC Rocket Runabout "Rocket Man"

jfrprops
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by jfrprops » Sun Mar 11, 2018 11:50 am

I would not use that "high test" (93) gas.....designed for higher compression engine that what I would assume you have.
IMHO
JOhn in Va.
1980 Fairchild Scout 30
19?? custom Argentine Runabout 16'
1954 Whirlwind deluxe dual ckpt 16'
1921 Old Town Charles River 17' (founding Captain, James River Batteau Festival)

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Don Vogt
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Don Vogt » Sun Mar 11, 2018 7:46 pm

usually the ethanol free gas comes only in the higher octane ratings. As i understand it, the higher octane just means that the gas all explodes at the same time. I am not aware that this creates any problems?
1938 Chris Craft 17' Deluxe Runabout "Jennifer II"

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Bilge Rat
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Bilge Rat » Mon Mar 12, 2018 6:29 am

I have a 6 year old Rayco aluminum tank and I run 91 octane non-ethanol gas in it. The gas is available at the marinas I stop at as well as a local on-land gas station. The Graymarine documentation says it wants a minimum of 89 octane and 91 octane is all that's available in non-ethanol.
1966 Lyman Cruisette 25 foot "Serenity Now!"
1953 Chris Craft Sportsman 22 foot "Summerwind"

Badger85
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Badger85 » Mon Mar 12, 2018 6:26 pm

Does an Occasional Tank of Premium Help Keep a Car's Motor Clean?
As strange as this question sounds, this is a common and long-standing practice among many motorists who consider an occasional tank of premium a special treatment that will help their engines last longer.

The basis for this assumption is that a tank of higher octane gasoline, maybe because it costs more, will somehow reduce engine wear. The assumption is fundamentally incorrect, though an occasional tank of premium may help an engine in other ways.

An engine's design, which includes such factors as its combustion ratio and its operating temperature, is related to something called an octane rating. Usually, we think of an octane rating as something that applies only to gasoline, but the engine itself has such a rating that represents the minimum octane level that the engine requires for proper operation.

An engine needs a minimum level of octane to avoid ping, which is caused by uncontrolled combustion of fuel inside the cylinders. Excessive ping can severely damage the engine. The octane rating on the gasoline is a measure of its anti-knock or anti-ping properties.

If your car does not ping on regular, then there is no reason to seek a higher-octane gasoline. The anti-knock level of the regular in this case is adequate for the engine.

But as a car gets older, depending on how the car has been driven and cared for, it may need a higher-octane gasoline anytime between four and six years. That's because carbon deposits inside the cylinders raise the combustion ratio, which in turn raises the engine's octane rating. You may notice that your car operated fine on regular fuel when it was new, but pings on regular as it gets older. So, the higher-octane fuel is not something to pamper a new car with but rather help keep an older car running properly.

In addition, premium gasoline has some other selling points. Most premium gasolines have a higher-quality additive package put in at the refinery. The actual additives in a particular brand of gasoline are generally not disclosed by refiners. But usually they include detergents and other solvents that keep the carburetor and rest of the fuel system clean.

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Don Vogt
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Don Vogt » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:15 pm

good points. My thought was that the main issue is to go to non-ethanol. Unfortunately, as I noted, it usually only comes with a higher octane rating. this may not be "needed" and of course costs more, but getting away from ethanol is the main benefit.
1938 Chris Craft 17' Deluxe Runabout "Jennifer II"

Greg Wallace
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Greg Wallace » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:05 am

Pretty sure E10 "regular" will clean things up just fine....maybe too fine, especially carbon. IMHO higher octane does nothing if not required by engine spec. If you're stuck with Ethanol, remember your "Startron" or equivalent and good water separator.
Greg Wallace 23 Custom 22166 former Chris-Craft dealer Russells Point, Oh.

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Bilge Rat
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Re: Replacement Fuel Tank

Post by Bilge Rat » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:33 am

I second on using the Startron or an ethanol treatment of your choice. Don't even leave ethanol fuel in the tank or carb when off-season storing. The water it can absorb is trouble come Spring. Make sure your fuel hoses, fuel pump diaphragm and carb floats can handle ethanol enhanced fuels.

Oh and as to the cost of higher octane non-ethanol gas...this is boating, it's supposed to cost more! Insert your favorite acronym for BOAT here.
1966 Lyman Cruisette 25 foot "Serenity Now!"
1953 Chris Craft Sportsman 22 foot "Summerwind"

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